Search
Close this search box.
Notifications
Clear all

[Solved] Biaxial data in mcalibration

9 Posts
4 Users
1 Reactions
1,326 Views
Posts: 5
Topic starter
(@hossein-shf)
Active Member
Joined: 5 years ago

How can I import biaxial data into MCalibration?

Topic Tags
8 Replies
Posts: 6
(@matteo)
Active Member
Joined: 8 years ago

Hi Mahawat,
could you share with us the curves to get an idea about the differences you mention?

Topic Tags
8 Replies
Posts: 3998
(@jorgen)
Member
Joined: 5 years ago

MCalibration can import and work with equibiaxial data. We are working on adding support for non-equibiaxial data.

-Jorgen

Reply
Posts: 4
(@lukevoce)
New Member
Joined: 11 months ago

Hi Jorgen,

Do you have an update on the support for importing non-equibiaxial data?

-Luke

Reply
Posts: 3998
(@jorgen)
Member
Joined: 5 years ago

Unfortunately we have not yet implemented that load case type. We are still interested in it, but we have a long list of things to work on, and that task has so far only a low priority.  Can you give me one or more examples of why you need that ability? That would help me increase the priority of that task.

/Jorgen

Reply
2 Replies
(@lukevoce)
Joined: 11 months ago

New Member
Posts: 4

@jorgen 

Many biological tissues, especially those in the cardiovascular system like arteries and heart valves, have been shown to experience non-equivalent bidirectional strains in vivo. When we have developed constitutive models for heart valve tissue in the past using MCalibration, we have only been able to use equi-biaxial data to generate the coefficients for the constitutive model. We’ve then had to validate multiple solutions by simulating nonequi-bixial loading in ANSYS and compare those results with our experimental testing. There is obvious error here without the ability to include nonequi-biaxial data into MCalibration and generate a constitutive model that reflects the complete behavior of heart valve tissue as it would in vivo.

Reply
(@lukevoce)
Joined: 11 months ago

New Member
Posts: 4

@jorgen Hi Jorgen,

Do you have any further update on adding this load case. I think it would greatly improve the accuracy of modeling our soft tissue. 

 

Thanks,

Luke

Reply
Posts: 3998
(@jorgen)
Member
Joined: 5 years ago

That new feature is still on our list of things to add. Can you let me know what format your experimental data is in? 

What are the columns in your experimental data file?

/Jorgen

Reply
Posts: 4
(@lukevoce)
New Member
Joined: 11 months ago

The biaxial data would be in the form of stress and strain for two orthogonal directions (e.g., radial and axial). The non-equibiaxial tests are strain determined in ratios of max strain, 1:2 or 1:3. Where the max strain achieved for one direction (radial) is 2x that of the other direction (axial), in the case of 1:2. 

So, the columns in this case would be radial strain (up to 30%) with corresponding axial stress and then axial strain (up to 15%) with corresponding radial stress. 

 

Does this answer your question?

 

-Luke

Reply
Share: